The Catalyst

The “Tea”

J'Lynne Raines, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Ladies and gentleman, we all have one thing that no matter what, gives us something to look forward to. The barbershop or hair salon.  On a personal note, when us ladies go to the beauty salon it is a fun, complex experience. There is so much to think about, especially for African American women, even when preparing to go to the shop. We have to clear our calendars, because every sista’ knows getting our hair done can take HOURS. It is a tedious job. We have to pick the right stylist  and an intricate style. There are so many options to pick from, such as cornrows, braids, twists, pixie cuts, bantu knots, waves etc. Then there are the various type of weaves, like Peruvian, Indian, Malaysian, Eurasian, and Brazilian. Regardless of what style you choose, you know you are going to walk out looking like a million dollars. Once you get your hair done, it is a matter of keeping it looking nice. African American women  try to avoid getting their fresh do wet at ANY cost, whether it is using an umbrella or a plastic bag over our hair. Oh, and you would not dare let someone take their grimy fingers and touch your hair. THAT is simply a no-no. We take every measure to keep it looking just like it did when we first got it done. The wonderful invention of the bonnet has often come into play to protect our styles.  

Now, to get back to our roots, we need to pay homage and give admiration to the woman who started it all, Madam C.J. Walker. She was not only an entrepreneur and the first self-made female millionaire, she was also a civil rights activist and philanthropist. She paved the way not only for females, but for African Americans as well. She invented the first hot comb and made herself a household name also with the creation of her own pomade. For anyone who does not know, a hot comb is used to straighten hair by the use of heat.

Throughout history, hair to African American women and men has been very important. Now for African American men, the barbershop is a relaxing safe haven. For men, the barbershop is a place where they can talk about social, economic and political issues. It is a way of communication and also can be used for planning for the future. Hair is important to lots of people, however, it is especially essential in the African American community. Hair specifically is an identifier. Hair is a form of expression.  It has a deep rooted meaning in our lives.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • The “Tea”

    Top Stories

    When Social Media Becomes a Chore

  • The “Tea”

    Top Stories

    Why Teach Fish to Climb Trees?

  • The “Tea”

    Opinion

    A Seniors’ Feature: The Final Countdown

  • The “Tea”

    A&E

    Best Music by the Decades

  • The “Tea”

    Feature

    The Growth of Technology

  • Feature

    Sophomores Sliding

  • The “Tea”

    Feature

    The Man Behind Our Principal

  • The “Tea”

    A&E

    What are you Watching Your Movies on?

  • The “Tea”

    News

    Mr. Cassatta is Leaving Harrison

  • The “Tea”

    Sports

    Stealing in China

The news site of Harrison High School.
The “Tea”